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U.S. Annual Income Divided into Thirds

January 5, 2011

This is from the same data I used in this post. It shows to which households the U.S. annual income goes if we divide it into thirds.

In the pie chart the circle represents the percentage of the population receiving each approximate third of 2009 U.S. income. The bar graph below shows the actual received income, because it was not possible to break it into exact third pieces.

If we bracket by below $100,000 year; we have the first 25.5% of U.S. income which is held by 87.1% of U.S. households.

Bracketing between $100,00 a year and $500,000 a year; we get the next 41.3% of U.S. income which is held by 12.1% of U.S. households.

Household incomes above $500,000 a year receive the final 33.3% of total U.S. income, going to the top 0.8% of total U.S. households.

Analysis

What is a fair income distribution is a contentious issue and probably varies between societies. I’ve posted this because I thought it was interesting, it also does seem a little skewed that the bottom 87% receives only 25% of annual income. In the interest of furthering the conversation on this topic I’ve also posted a link to the U.S. annual income distribution for 2009 here.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. 5random1 permalink
    January 6, 2011 12:21 am

    Third paragraph below bar chart needs another >zero0,<,000 a year receive the final 33.3% of total U.S. income, going to the top 0.8% of total U.S. households.

    • January 6, 2011 12:25 am

      You’re Right, Thanks!

      I might have caught it in a proof-read (or maybe not), but your correction was quite prompt… which is commendable.

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